Minnesota Disbars Attorney For Bankruptcy Fraud

A lawyer allegedly spent years assisting a client in hiding assets from a bankruptcy trustee and creditors. The Minnesota Supreme Court entered an order disbarring the attorney on December 30, 2022. No. A-19-0864. There was also a federal prosecution.

https://www.wctrib.com/news/local/former-willmar-attorney-gregory-anderson-to-serve-18-months-for-bankruptcy-fraud-for-hiding-clients-assets

Coaching Witness By Text Message Leads to a 91-day suspension

The Supreme Court of Florida recently decided The Florida Bar v. Derek Vashon James, NO. SC20-128 (November 18, 2021). During a remote deposition, the attorney for one of the parties in a worker’s compensation proceeding coached the witness by sending text messages to the witness with suggested answers to questions. Opposing counsel noticed that the witness was reading text messages and later received some of the messages when they were inadvertently sent to her. She filed a motion for a protective order. “The judge found that the text messages were sent during the deposition, not during a break in the questioning, and that they were not protected by attorney-client privilege, contrary to Jame’s claims.”

The disciplinary referee “found that James’s texts to [the witness] while she was being questioned, telling her what to say, how to answer, to avoid providing certain information, to remember a deposition but not discuss certain checks, and to not give an absolute answer were dishonest.” p. 5. “The referee found the following aggravating factors were present: (1) dishonest or selfish motive; (2) refusal to acknowledge the wrongful nature of the conduct; and (3) substantial experience in the practice of law. In mitigation, the referee found (1) the absence of a prior disciplinary record; (2) full and free disclosure to the Bar or cooperative attitude toward the proceedings; and (3) good character or reputation.”

The referee found that the attorney had violated Rule 3.4(a) (“a lawyer must not … unlawfully obstruct another party’s access to evidence or otherwise unlawfully alter, destroy, or conceal a document….”). The Supreme Court of Florida affirmed that finding. The Supreme Court reversed the referee’s finding that the attorney had not violated Rule 8.4(d) (“a lawyer shall not engage in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice….”). The Supreme Court of Florida found that the behavior of the attorney warranted a ninety-one-day suspension.

New York Disbars Attorney For Sexting With Client

The attorney was disbarred after an exchange of text messages with a client. The opinion notes the following:

“Respondent was admitted to the practice of law by this Court on June 24, 1993, and he formerly maintained an office in Auburn. In August 2020, the Grievance Committee filed a petition asserting against respondent a single charge of professional misconduct, which alleges that he engaged in conduct that adversely reflects on his fitness as a lawyer by sending to a client via text message four unsolicited images of his genitalia. The Grievance Committee simultaneously filed a motion for an order suspending respondent from the practice of law on an interim basis on the ground that he had failed to cooperate in a grievance investigation concerning five additional client complaints. Respondent thereafter failed to appear before this Court or to file papers in response to that motion and, by order entered September 16, 2020, the Court suspended respondent from the practice of law on an interim basis effective immediately and until further order of the Court (Matter of Moody, 187 AD3d 1603 [4th Dept 2020]). Respondent remains suspended pursuant to that order. In January 2021, the Grievance Committee filed a second petition asserting against respondent four charges of professional misconduct, including neglecting client matters, failing to refund unearned legal fees, failing to cooperate in the grievance investigation, and failing to comply with attorney registration requirements.
In June 2021, the Grievance Committee filed a motion for an order, pursuant to 22 NYCRR 1240.8 (a) (6), finding respondent in default and deeming admitted the allegations of both petitions on the ground that, although respondent was personally served with the petitions in August 2020 and January 2021, respectively, he failed to file an answer within 20 days after he was served as required under the rules of this Court (see 22 NYCRR 1020.8 [b]). The Grievance Committee has filed proof that respondent was personally served with the motion for default in May 2021. Respondent thereafter failed to file papers in response to the motion on or before the deadline imposed by the Court. Consequently, we grant the motion of the Grievance Committee, find respondent in default on the petitions, and deem admitted the allegations therein.

With respect to the sole charge of the petition filed in August 2020, respondent admits that, in late 2018, he was retained to represent a client in a criminal matter. Respondent admits that, on or about April 20, 2019, while the criminal matter was pending, he engaged in a series of text messages with the client whereby respondent sent to the client four unsolicited images of his genitalia. Respondent admits that, after the client filed a grievance complaint, respondent asserted during the investigation that he mistakenly believed he had been exchanging text messages with a friend or acquaintance who lives in Florida. Respondent admits, however, that the series of text messages between respondent and the client contain numerous references to the personal circumstances of the client, without any indication that respondent believed he was corresponding with a person other than the client.”

Comment: The sexting led to a finding that the lawyer had violated Rule 8.4(d) (conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice) and (h) (conduct that adversely reflects on his fitness as a lawyer). There were also charges that the lawyer had neglected certain client matters.

ARDC Hearing Board Recommends Suspension For Attorney Who Made False or Reckless Statements Impugning Judge’s Integrity

An ARDC Hearing Board panel has recommended a suspension for an attorney who made false or reckless statements impugning the integrity of a judge. Here is a quote from the excellent opinion of the panel:

“The Administrator proved by clear and convincing evidence that Respondent sent three emails to Magistrate Judge Finnegan’s email account containing statements about Magistrate Judge Finnegan’s integrity that were false or made with reckless disregard as to their truth or falsity. By sending the inappropriate emails, particularly after being instructed not to do so, Respondent engaged in conduct that disrupted the tribunal and prejudiced the administration of justice…..

Respondent has been licensed to practice in Illinois since 2006. She is also licensed in Texas and Michigan. (Tr. 54-55).

Barry Epstein hired Respondent in 2012 to represent him in a dissolution proceeding filed by Paula Epstein. In 2014, Respondent filed a complaint on Barry’s behalf in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, alleging that Paula and her attorney, Jay Frank, violated federal law by accessing Barry’s private emails without his authorization. (Tr. 55). Magistrate Judge Sheila Finnegan (Judge Finnegan) supervised discovery in the federal proceeding. Judge Finnegan maintained an email account known as the “proposed order account”. The charges before us arise from three email messages Respondent sent to the proposed order account and others involved in the Epstein proceedings.  (Tr. 56).

Respondent sent the first email at issue on April 18, 2017, after Judge Finnegan denied her emergency motion for an extension of time to take Paula’s deposition. Respondent sent the email

to the proposed order account, opposing counsel Scott Schaefers, and Scott White, the courtroom deputy. It stated as follows in relevant part:

Today in court, no matter what I said to you, you had already made up your mind, and even questioned my sincerity with regard to my preparation for upcoming trial.

***

. . . since the beginning, you never seem to doubt anything he [Schaefers] says, as you appear to doubt me. Still, I stated to you in open court that “I don’t want to be hated” for doing my job, but it sure seems that way, as I never get a break. Scott is the lucky guy who senses same as he can just pick up the phone to call you knowing he will get his way…or for so-called the Posner Defense2.

***

It’s not fair that my client (and I) is [sic] being treated badly for suing his wife/ex wife, and everyone is protecting Paula – why? Since when does “two” wrongs make a “right”? [sic] How am I to prove my case if I am not given a fair chance to do my work, properly.

(Adm. Ex. 1).

The following day, Judge Finnegan instructed Respondent that the parties were not to use the proposed order account to argue the merits of a motion, share their feelings about a ruling, or talk generally about the case with her. She told Respondent her email was improper and directed her not to send any such emails in the future. (Adm. Ex. 1). Respondent received and understood Judge Finnegan’s instructions.  (Tr. 69-70).

On June 15, 2017, Respondent filed a motion to extend discovery and for leave to depose Jay Frank. Judge Finnegan denied the motion. Allison Engel, Judge Finnegan’s law clerk, emailed a copy of Judge Finnegan’s order to Respondent and Schaefers at 6:37 p.m. on June 23, 2017. Two hours later, Respondent sent an email to Engel, Schaefers, and the proposed order account which stated as follows, in relevant part:

I’m very upset, I do not agree with Judge Finnegan’s order and I will depose the former co-defendant, Jay Frank, despite the fact this court is protecting him and his co-conspirer! Scott Schaefers had no standing to challenge my subpoena to depose

Jay Frank! I’m entitled to depose him! And I will call him to testy [sic] at trial to show the world what a corrupt lawyer he is! And the judges who protect this criminal by squeezing the discovery deadlines!!! No no no!

This is outrageous order of Judge Finnegan and it will be addressed accordingly! Judges are helping the criminal to escape punishment by forcing to shorten all deadlines!!!

This Judge is violating my client’s rights first by the truncated discovery deadlines and now helping Plaintiff to escape punishment for wrongs she committed!

I’m outraged by the miscarriage of justice and judges are in this to delay and deny justice for my client!

I’m sickened by this Order!!! (Adm. Ex. 2).

On June 26, 2017, Respondent sent another email to Engel, Schaefers, and the proposed order account, which stated as follows in relevant part:

Plaintiff’s motion is not late just because this court decided not to extend discovery deadlines, to protect the Defendant! I have asked this court numerous times for an extension of all cutoff deadlines, without avail. Take this into account when drafting your flawed order.

***

For anyone to insult me in this degree calls questions [sic] this court’s sincerity and veracity. How dare you accuse me of not having looked at the SC docket regularly.

***

How do you know I did not see the SC order???? Where do you get this information? Exparte communications with Defendant’s attorney, Scott? – smearing dirt behind my back?

The more I read this order, again and again, I am sick to my stomach, and I get filled with anger and disgust over this ‘fraudulent’ order by this court!

***

You both, Allison and J. Finnegan, have done me wrong, and depicted me very poorly in your public order. How dare you do that to me?!

What goes around comes around, justice will be done at the end! I wonder how you people sleep at night? Including Scott!(Adm. Ex. 3).

On June 27, 2017, Judge Finnegan entered an order admonishing Respondent for violating her directives related to the proposed order account and making highly inappropriate statements. Judge Finnegan directed Respondent to immediately cease all email communication with her and her staff. (Adm. Ex. 4).

Respondent acknowledged it was wrong to send the emails but presented numerous explanations for her conduct. She testified she was under a great deal of stress due to a short discovery schedule in the federal case, her client’s abusive behavior, and a dispute with a former partner. (Tr. 190-91, 213-217). She further testified she made poor word choices because English is not her native language and she wrote the emails “in the heat of the moment” when she felt the court was insulting her. In addition, she testified that the purpose of the proposed order account was unclear. (Tr. 164, 292). With respect to the second and third  emails, she did not think she was violating Judge Finnegan’s directives because she addressed the emails to Judge Finnegan’s law clerk rather than to Judge Finnegan.  (Tr. 68, 77).

Respondent’s belief that she and her client were not being treated fairly was based upon the entirety of the record, including the short discovery schedule and rulings that were not favorable to her client. (Tr. 67-68).

After the Epstein matter ended, Judge Finnegan submitted a complaint about Respondent’s conduct to the Executive Committee of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois (Executive Committee). On January 22, 2018, the Executive Committee suspended Respondent from the general bar for six months and the trial bar for twelve months. The Executive Committee found that Respondent used “unprofessional, inappropriate, and threatening language” in her emails. In order to be reinstated, Respondent was required to demonstrate that she obtained professional assistance with managing her anger and complying with the Rules of Professional Conduct. (Adm. Ex. 7). The Executive Committee reinstated Respondent to the general bar on August 7, 2018 and the trial bar on June 11, 2019.  (Adm. Exs. 9, 10).

C.         Analysis and Conclusions Rule 8.2(a)

Attorneys may express disagreement with a judge’s rulings but, as officers of the court, have a duty to protect the integrity of the courts and the legal  profession.        In re Walker, 2014PR00132, M.R. 28453 (March 20, 2017) (Hearing Bd. at 19-20). Consequently, Rule 8.2(a) prohibits an attorney from making a statement concerning the qualifications or integrity of a judge that she knows to be false or with reckless disregard as to its truth or falsity. Ill. R. Prof’l Conduct 8.2(a). Respondent is charged with violating Rule 8.2(a) when she made the statements set forth above impugning Judge Finnegan’s integrity. We find the Administrator proved this charge by clear and convincing evidence.

It is undisputed that Respondent made the statements at issue. The fact that she made them in email messages rather than in a pleading or document available to the public makes no difference. Rule 8.2(a) applies broadly, with no limitation as to where or how a statement is made. The statements at issue clearly pertained to Judge Finnegan’s qualifications and integrity.

Respondent not only expressly questioned Judge Finnegan’s “sincerity and veracity” but accused her of protecting and assisting criminal conduct, participating in improper ex parte communications with attorney Schaefers, and entering a “fraudulent” order. These statements unquestionably crossed the line from expressing disagreement with rulings to making unsubstantiated accusations that maligned Judge Finnegan’s honesty. An attorney violates Rule 8.2(a) by making such statements without a reasonable basis for believing they are true. There is no such reasonable basis on the record before us.

Although Respondent disputes that she knowingly or recklessly made false statements, she had no objective, factual basis for her comments. Subjective belief, suspicion, speculation, or conjecture does not constitute a reasonable belief. Walker, 2014PR00132 (Hearing Bd. at 21).

Here, Judge Finnegan, who is presumed to be impartial, set forth the factual and legal reasons why she denied Respondent’s requests to extend discovery. For Respondent to assert that Judge Finnegan made her rulings to deny justice to Barry Epstein and protect criminal conduct, rather than for the reasons articulated in her orders, was unreasonable and untenable. Respondent was not entitled to decisions in her client’s favor, and a judge’s rulings alone “almost never constitute a valid basis for a claim of judicial bias or partiality”. See Eychaner v. Gross, 202 Ill. 2d 228, 280 (2002). Likewise, there are no objective facts whatsoever to support Respondent’s accusations that Judge Finnegan’s conduct was “fraudulent” or that she engaged in improper ex parte communications.

Accordingly, we find that the Administrator established by clear and convincing evidence that Respondent made statements concerning Judge Finnegan’s qualifications and integrity that were false or made with reckless disregard for their truth or falsity, in violation of Rule 8.2(a).”

Comment: Every lawyer will confront situations where the court rules in a manner that is unexpected or unforeseen. It is a challenge in these situations to control your temper and act in a professional manner. As lawyers we owe our clients a duty to render effective advocacy and that duty requires us to be courteous to the court. We all make mistakes and we all can become frustrated with the judicial process. That is no excuse for attacking the integrity of a judge or the judicial system. When you feel yourself becoming angry or intemperate, that is the time to take a step back and apologize if you have made an intemperate remark.

If you have a question about an ethics issue, do not hesitate to call us. We can often provide some assistance. The earlier you make that call the better, as many errors can be mitigated or corrected.

Ed Clinton, Jr.

Lawyer Suspended For Violating An Order of Protection And Failing To Report Conviction to ARDC

The Hearing Board suspended a lawyer for two years and until order of court for the conduct described below:

“An emergency order of protection, entered following the dissolution of Respondent’s marriage, prohibited Respondent from contacting his ex-wife or entering their former home. Even though Respondent was personally served with that order, he sent his ex-wife multiple text messages. After being arrested for violating the order of protection, Respondent sent his ex-wife additional text messages. Those messages included false claims, which Respondent reiterated to police and medical personnel, that he had been raped. He was arrested again. Subsequently, Respondent entered and removed property from the marital house and then drove to his ex-wife’s residence, conduct for which Respondent was arrested a third time.Respondent pled guilty to violating the order of protection and was placed on probation. Probation was revoked after Respondent violated probation by continuing to use alcohol and failing to report.

In aggravation, Panel considered the fact that Respondent violated court orders knowingly, repeatedly and over time. His false claims of rape included racial slurs. Respondent’s minimal participation in his own disciplinary proceedings is a serious aggravating factor. Although he participated the first prehearing, thereafterRespondent ignored these proceedings.”

The decision was issued on September 16, 2021. 2020 PR 00069. The respondent was charged with (a) conviction of a crime and (b) failing to report his conviction to the Administrator.

The Clouds Surrounding Rudy Giuliani Are Getting Darker

Recently, the Appellate Division of the State of New York issued an interim suspension of Rudy Giuliani’s law license on the ground that he repeatedly made false statements to courts concerning the 2020 election. This was an interim proceeding. Giuliani will get an opportunity to address the allegations at the hearing in that matter. Giuliani contests the allegations. However, the court concluded that:

“….[W]e conclude that there is uncontroverted evidence that respondent communicated demonstrably false and misleading statements to courts, lawmakers and the public at large in his capacity as lawyer for former President Donald J. Trump and the Trump campaign in connection with Trump’s failed effort at reelection in 2020. These false statements were made to improperly bolster respondent’s narrative that due to widespread voter fraud, victory in the 2020 United States presidential election was stolen from his client.”

In the Matter of Rudolph Giuliani, Case No. 2021-00506 (New York Appellate Division First Judicial Department), May 3, 2021.

The interim suspension is controversial, but it is an important opinion.

Today, another shoe dropped on Giuliani. In the case US Dominion, Inc. v. Giuliani, No. 21-cv-2013 (the sister case is US Dominion v. Powell, No. 21-cv-0040), the court held that Dominion’s claim for defamation stated a claim. When a defamation lawsuit is filed, the defendant will typically file a motion to dismiss. If the motion is granted with prejudice, the case comes to an end. If the motion is denied, the case goes forward to discovery. Dominion ultimately bears the burden of proof and, no doubt, Giuliani will contest the allegations in the Complaint. In my experience few defamation lawsuits survive a motion to dismiss. When a case does survive a motion to dismiss, that is a serious matter for the defendants.

In his motion to dismiss, Giuliani argued that Dominion did not adequately allege that it was damaged by Giuliani’s actions. The court rejected the claims and denied the motion to dismiss. Discovery will soon proceed on these claims.

“The Court is not aware of any case requiring a corporate plaintiff alleging defamation per se to plead damages specially, and by its terms Rule 9(g) does not include such a requirement. In any event, Dominion has pleaded lost profits with the particularity required by Rule 9(g). Under that rule, a defamation plaintiff must set “forth the precise nature of [its] losses as well as the way in which the special damages resulted from the allegedly false publication.” Schoen v. Wash. Post, 246 F.2d 670, 672 (D.C. Cir. 1957). Here, Dominion alleges that Giuliani made defamatory statements about its involvement in the 2020 election, that the people who believed those statements made threats to Dominion employees and board members, and that those threats required Dominion to spend more than $565,000 on private security to protect its employees. Giuliani Compl. ¶ 126. Although Giuliani contends that Dominion may satisfy Rule 9(g) only by “identifying either particular customers whose business has been lost or facts showing an established business and the amount of sales before and after the disparaging publication, along with evidence of causation,” Browning v. Clinton, 292 F.3d 235, 245 (D.C. Cir. 2002), the cases he cites merely provide examples of how a plaintiff may specifically state pecuniary harm and demonstrate that those harms resulted from defendant’s conduct. In its Complaint against Giuliani, Dominion alleges that it suffered economic harm in the form of additional expenses that it would not have incurred if not for Giuliani’s alleged defamation, as well as the loss of future contracts. See also Giuliani Compl. ¶¶ 128 (noting that Dominion has incurred $1,170,000 in expenses to mitigate harm to reputation and business); id. ¶ 135 (projecting lost profits of $200 million over the next five years when reduced to present value).25 Dominion has also alleged how those losses resulted from Giuliani’s defamatory statements. Id. ¶¶ 106–32. The Complaint therefore alleges lost profits with adequate specificity and survives Giuliani’s Motion to Dismiss.”

There will be more proceedings to come in these cases. They are important cases for anyone interested in legal ethics.

Ed Clinton, Jr.

http://www.clintonlaw.net

Lawyer Held In Contempt For Refusing To Follow Court Orders

Eisenberg v. Swain, No. 19-cv-189, District of Columbia Court of Appeals began modestly with an effort by the attorney (Eisenberg) to collect fees owed to him from his client. He obtained a judgment and garnished $1499 in wages. After that he learned that the former client had filed a bankruptcy petition. The Superior Court entered certain orders against the attorney as follows:

The Superior Court ordered Mr. Eisenberg to return the garnished wages to Ms. Swain until a decision was reached on whether his judgment against her was included in the bankruptcy discharge. Mr. Eisenberg did not comply. The Superior Court then issued an order that included three rulings: (1) it ruled that Ms. Swain’s debt to Mr. Eisenberg had been discharged, (2) it held Mr. Eisenberg in contempt of court for his failure to return the garnished wages, and (3) it rejected Mr. Eisenberg’s request to add Ms. Swain’s bankruptcy attorney as a defendant in the underlying breach of contract case after Mr. Eisenberg alleged that Ms. Swain’s attorney had conspired with her to defraud Mr. Eisenberg.

Usually when a debtor files a bankruptcy petition, there is an automatic stay of all collection proceedings against the debtor. In this case the trial court understood the bankruptcy stay applied and ordered Eisenberg to return the garnished wages to the debtor until the bankruptcy had been adjudicated. The lawyer then refused to do so and was held in contempt. He then apparently attempted to add the debtor’s bankruptcy attorney to the case. The trial court rejected this request and Eisenberg appealed. The DC Court of Appeals affirmed.

Eisenberg’s appeal of the contempt order was rejected on several grounds. The relevant portion of the Court’s opinion is quoted below:

Mr. Eisenberg challenges Judge Pan’s contempt ruling and associated sanctions. Mr. Eisenberg’s actions in this litigation justified holding him in contempt. We affirm the trial court’s judgment on this ground as well.

Mr. Eisenberg was ordered to return $1,499 to Ms. Swain on November 17, 2016. His motion to stay the return of these funds was denied on February 23, 2017. Despite twice receiving clear instruction from the court to return $1,499 to Ms. Swain, Mr. Eisenberg had not returned the funds when he appeared before the court on December 3, 2018, more than two years after the initial order, and nearly two years after his motion to stay return of the funds was denied. When questioned by the trial court on the reasons for his noncompliance, Mr. Eisenberg said only, “I believe the judgment was actually void given the history that we have gone through,” adding later that he believed “federal law” superseded the Superior Court’s authority and that Judge Pan had relinquished jurisdiction over the issue. When asked why, given these beliefs, he had not filed a motion to reconsider, Mr. Eisenberg responded that he “wasn’t aware that was an option.” At other points during this exchange, however, Mr. Eisenberg represented that he kept the funds in his trust account because “Ms. Swain had been resistant and deceptive, and [he] wanted to make sure [he] preserved [his] property” and that “those monies were [his], and … since they were in dispute … [he] left them in the trust account.” These alternating and seemingly self-serving rationales left Judge Pan with the well-founded impression that after receiving a ruling he did not like, Mr. Eisenberg “just did what [he] wanted to do” and that his actions were “[n]ot in good faith.” Judge Pan issued an order to show cause why Mr. Eisenberg should not be held in contempt and requested briefing from both parties.

At a second hearing, held on February 25, 2019, Judge Pan questioned Mr. Eisenberg and Ms. Swain on their positions regarding contempt. In conjunction with this questioning, Judge Pan asked Ms. Swain to detail the expenses she had incurred as a result of not having the $1,499 returned to her. These included moving expenses after Ms. Swain was unable to pay her rent and had to relocate, as well as time spent litigating the issue in Superior Court. In a written order issued on March 1, 2019, Judge Pan held Mr. Eisenberg in contempt of court and ordered him to pay compensatory damages to Ms. Swain in the amount of $978.22.[5]

Superior Court judges have express authority to “punish for disobedience of an order or for contempt committed in the presence of the court.” D.C. Code § 11-944(a) (2012 Repl.) In addition to its statutorily derived authority, the court retains a well-established power to punish for contempt that is “inherent in the nature and constitution of a court … arising from the need to enforce compliance with the administration of the law.” Brooks v. United States, 686 A.2d 214, 220 (D.C. 1996) (citation and quotation marks omitted). The decision whether to hold a party in civil contempt is confided to the sound discretion of the trial judge, and will be reversed on appeal only upon a clear showing of abuse of discretion. In re T.S., 829 A.2d 937, 940 (D.C. 2003).

In challenging the trial court’s contempt ruling, Mr. Eisenberg advances three arguments: (1) that the Superior Court did not have substantive jurisdiction over the garnished funds, (2) that the underlying order was vague and ambiguous as to when the money had to be returned to Ms. Swain, and (3) that, for a variety of ill-supported reasons, his actions could not be deemed contemptuous. Each argument is meritless.

Mr. Eisenberg claims that the Superior Court lacked substantive jurisdiction over the garnished wages, rendering the underlying order requiring him to return the money to Ms. Swain void. While it is true that “[v]oidness of a court order is an absolute defense to a contempt motion,” an order is void for lack of jurisdiction only when the issuing court is “powerless to enter it.” Kammerman v. Kammerman, 543 A.2d 794, 799 (D.C. 1988) (citation omitted). Mr. Eisenberg asserts that the Superior Court did not have substantive jurisdiction over the disputed funds because they were under the exclusive jurisdiction of the bankruptcy court. As explained in detail above, he is wrong about that. Because Mr. Eisenberg’s debt was unscheduled, the funds at issue were subject to the concurrent jurisdiction of the Superior Court. See, e.g., In re Rollison, 579 B.R. at 72-73.

Mr. Eisenberg also argues that any substantive jurisdiction the Superior Court may have had was nonetheless waived by Judge Pan’s statement in the order that she was “not in a position to evaluate the merits of plaintiff’s motion to dismiss defendant’s bankruptcy.” Mr. Eisenberg relies heavily on this statement, alleging in his brief that the Superior Court “at the time chose to relinquish its jurisdiction over the disputed money as it pertained to the [federal bankruptcy law] issue and send it to [the bankruptcy court].” Mr. Eisenberg advances this interpretation despite the immediately preceding sentence in the order, which reads, “[Mr. Eisenberg] is not entitled to garnishment at this time, and it would be unjust to allow [Mr. Eisenberg] to retain defendant’s money pending the outcome of [Ms. Swain]’s bankruptcy matter,” and the immediately following sentence, which reads, “[t]he Court, therefore, denies plaintiff’s motion to stay the order releasing garnishment.” In the context of the order as a whole, Mr. Eisenberg’s suggestion that Judge Pan expressly relinquished jurisdiction over the garnished funds is patently unreasonable.[6]

We likewise reject Mr. Eisenberg’s assertion that the order was vague because it did not list a date by which the funds had to be returned. Nothing in the record suggests a genuine confusion on Mr. Eisenberg’s part about when the return of funds was required. To the contrary, in Mr. Eisenberg’s motion to stay the return of the garnished funds, he acknowledged that the court had “ordered the moneys be returned to Ms. Swain,” but specifically requested that the order be stayed “pending the exhaustion of his legal remedies.” In her order denying this motion, Judge Pan stated that it would be unjust to allow Mr. Eisenberg to keep the money “pending the outcome of defendant’s bankruptcy matter” and ordered the funds returned. To the extent that there was any ambiguity in the initial order, it is clear from the ensuing litigation that the order contemplated the prompt return of the funds during the pendency of the bankruptcy matter. Under any interpretation of the language of the order, a delay of two years—during which time Mr. Eisenberg actively pursued his claims in both bankruptcy court and the Superior Court—is clearly not contemplated. Finally, “the proper response to a seemingly ambiguous court order is not to read it as one wishes.” Loewinger v. Stokes, 977 A.2d 901, 907 (D.C. 2009). If a party subject to a court order genuinely does not understand its requirements, he may “apply to the court for construction or modification.” Id. To fail to take such steps is “to act at one’s peril as to what the court’s ultimate interpretation of the order will be.” Id. (quoting D.D. v. M.T., 550 A.2d 37, 44 (D.C. 1988)).

The court of appeals also rejected the attempt to add the bankruptcy lawyer as a defendant.

Mr. Eisenberg argues that the trial court erred in denying his motion to join Ms. Swain’s bankruptcy attorney, Mr. Moses, in the underlying breach of contract action. According to Mr. Eisenberg, Mr. Moses should have been joined as a party because he and Ms. Swain “conspired to defraud [Mr. Eisenberg] of moneys they knew were not dischargeable through bankruptcy.” Mr. Eisenberg does not assert that the trial court was required to join Mr. Moses under Super. Ct. Civ. R. 19, but that it erred in not joining him under Super. Ct. Civ. R. 20, governing permissive joinder. Rule 20 allows for the joinder of a defendant where any “right to relief is asserted against them jointly, severally, or in the alternative with respect to or arising out of the same transaction, occurrence, or series of transactions or occurrences” and “any question of law or fact common to all defendants will arise in the action.” Super. Ct. Civ. R. 20(a)(2). Superior Court Civil Rule 20 is largely identical to Rule 20 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. See Super. Ct. Civ. R. 20 cmt.; Fed. R. Civ. P. 20. As with its federal counterpart, we will review rulings on permissive joinder only for an abuse of discretion. See, e.g., Mosley v. Gen. Motors Corp., 497 F.2d 1330, 1332 (8th Cir. 1974) (“[T]he scope of the civil action is made a matter for the discretion of the district court, and a determination on the question of joinder of parties will be reversed on appeal only upon a showing of abuse of that discretion.”).

Mr. Eisenberg has not proffered any factual basis tying Mr. Moses to Mr. Eisenberg and Ms. Swain’s initial representation agreement, to the settlement agreement, or any other set of events relevant to the original contractual dispute in Superior Court. As the trial court noted, the contract dispute was already resolved in Superior Court with a full judgment in Mr. Eisenberg’s favor and the case was reopened for the limited purpose of addressing the discharge of debt. If Mr. Eisenberg believes he has a non-frivolous claim against Mr. Moses arising out of the proceedings in bankruptcy court, the proper course of action is to initiate a separate lawsuit. It is no basis to join Mr. Moses in the breach of contract case against Ms. Swain.

Comment: Deciding to defy a court order is a serious matter that should not be undertaken lightly. In my opinion, a lawyer should not subject himself to contempt proceedings in a dispute over his own legal fees. The decision to defy a court order should be undertaken only when the client’s important rights are at stake, such as preserving the attorney-client privilege or preserving the client’s 5th Amendment rights.

Should you have a question on an ethics issue, do not hesitate to call me.

Ed Clinton, Jr.

https://www.clintonlaw.net/legal-ethics.html

Court Dismisses Lawsuit Against Legal Ethics Publisher

On May 1, 2020, the federal district court for the Southern District of New York dismissed a lawsuit filed by Andrew Straw (a lawyer currently suspended from the practice of law in the State of Indiana) against Wolters Kluwer, a legal publisher. (20 CV 3251 S.D. NY). Straw claimed that the publisher violated his rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act by citing to an opinion disciplining him. The relevant parts of the opinion are quoted here:

Plaintiff contends that “[t]he book ridiculed me by making me seem totally incompetent just for asking [for] this information[. I]t seems the only information the defendants relied upon was the Indiana discipline order, In Re Straw, 68 N.E.3d 1070 (Ind. 2/14/2017).” (Id. at ¶ 46). He states that “the language [to which he] object[s] concerns [his] bogus Indiana Supreme Court discipline.” (Id. at ¶ 20).

In that disciplinary action, In Re Straw, 68 N.E.3d 1070 (Ind. 2017), cert. denied sub nom. Straw v. Ind. Supreme Court, 137 S. Ct. 2309 (2017), the Indiana Supreme Court suspended Plaintiff from the practice of law for violations of Indiana Professional Conduct Rule 3.1, which prohibits bringing a proceeding or asserting an issue unless there is a nonfrivolous basis in law and fact.[1] Plaintiff asserts that the publisher “should have asked me before ridiculing me,” and that “this blistering attack in a major book on legal ethics cannot stand.” (Id. at ¶ 47.) Plaintiff also rehashes arguments that he made in his suspension proceedings and elsewhere that his suit against the ABA was not frivolous because he did not seek to collect private data but rather sought to amend “form 509” in order to collect information about disability, in addition to race and gender. (Id. at ¶ 49).[2]

Plaintiff styles this action as a suit under “Title II/Title V” of the ADA, alleging that the publisher and its employees retaliated against him for his having filed the disability discrimination suit, Straw v. ABA., No. 14-CV-0519 (N.D. Ill. 2015), which is one of the suits that was deemed frivolous and was part of the basis for his suspension from the practice of law in Indiana. Plaintiff invokes “42 U.S.C. § 12203 and 28 C.F.R. § 35.134 [which] prohibit[s] retaliation by anyone.” (ECF 2 at 16, ¶ 60). He argues that “[r]epublishing the vicious attacks … amount to additional retaliation and collusion with that state supreme court.” (Id. at ¶ 62)……

“To state a claim for retaliation under the ADA …, a plaintiff must show: (i) he or she was engaged in protected activity; (ii) the alleged retaliator knew that plaintiff was involved in protected activity; (iii) an adverse decision or course of action was taken against plaintiff; and (iv) a causal connection exists between the protected activity and the adverse action.” Patrick v. Success Acad. Charter Sch., Inc., 354 F. Supp. 3d 185, 226 (E.D.N.Y. 2018) (addressing retaliation in the public services context) (citing Lawton v. Success Acad. Charter Sch., Inc., 323 F. Supp. 3d 353, 366 (E.D.N.Y. 2018) (quoting Weixel v. Bd. of Educ., 287 F.3d 138, 148 (2d Cir. 2002))); see also Sarno v. Douglas Elliman-Gibbons & Ives, Inc., 183 F.3d 155, 159 (2d Cir. 1999) (“[I]t is appropriate to apply the framework used in analyzing retaliation claims under Title VII in analyzing a claim of retaliation under the ADA.”).

Generally, “any activity designed “to resist or antagonize …; to contend against; to confront; resist; [or] withstand” discrimination prohibited by Title VII constitutes a protected oppositional activity.” Littlejohn v. City of New York, 795 F.3d 297, 317 (2d Cir. 2015) (quoting Crawford v. Metropolitan Government of Nashville & Davidson Cnty., 555 U.S. 271, 276 (2009)). Here, however, Plaintiff fails to plead any facts that could satisfy the third element of a retaliation claim. Publishing a book that accurately reports the Indiana state court’s disciplinary decision against Plaintiff, even if he continues to dispute the court’s decision, does not qualify as taking adverse action against Plaintiff.

Nor does Plaintiff plead any facts that could give rise to an inference that his suspension decision was used as an illustration in a book on legal ethics because of retaliatory animus against Plaintiff for his opposition to disability discrimination. Because Plaintiff fails to plead facts suggesting any causal connection between his ABA suit opposing discrimination and any adverse action against him, Plaintiff fails to state a claim that any Defendant retaliated against him in violation of his rights under the ADA.”

The court also rejected a claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress.

Ed Clinton, Jr.

Note: Andrew Straw is a member of the bar of the State of Virginia and is currently in good standing.